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, a she'ite muslim is helping to support the assad regime in syria. now, secretary kerry met with iraqi president nouri al-maliki during a visit in baghdad today. those iranian flights were at the top of the agenda. they had what kerry described as a spirited discussion. here is the secretary. >> anything that supports president assad is problematic and you i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are in fact helping to sustain president assad and his regime. >> reporter: the u.s. believes the iranian aircraft flying over iraq are carrying weapons to arm the syrian government but tehran says they are delivering only humanitarian aid there. they wanted to force the planes for inspections but only a few have been checked. >> i think the intent here by going public is to increase the pressure on al-maliki but the whole incident how minimal influence is on the regime in iraq and how minimal our ability to affect the conflict in syria has become. >> reporter: u.s. officials say the flights are taking place just about every day. kerry says the u.s. congress is
in just the. >> what is going to happen? >> ultimately bashar assad will fall. the timing the precise scenario are not known. but the rebels are encroaching. they control more ter another-- territory. they have half of aleppo. they are fighting in the outskirts of damascus am we can see the regime becomes more desperate with its back to the world, may or may not have used chemical weapons. but the calculus is the calculus of desperate -- >> may or may not have used chemical weapons. certainly not in an extent that might be powerful and that might change as the president said, be a game changer. they haven't used him that way. >> right. >> do you believe they would use them that way? that is not-- it's not they. the people bashar assad and those that are supporting him believe that that is the only thing they have left. >> they have made so many mistakes in the past two years that i can't really doubt. it would be a terrible act and a terrible mistake but i can't rule it out. >> rose: i think that they're testing obama. they are testing this red line that obama has put down. they have
it was the assad regime used some type of chemical weapons on rebels in northern syria, around the aleppo region. of course the assad regime and assad state television said rebels used those weapons. what we're hearing from western intelligence officials, it was opposite, assad regime used some type of chemical weapons and killed somewhere between 15 and 26 people. conflicting reports. we heard 15. we also heard 26. there is a lot of differing information right now. but we have confirmed of course, there have been some type of chemical weapons being used in syria. now who used them on exactly which group is still very much unclear right now, bill. bill: conor, thank you. just one line crossing the associated press at the moment here. reuters was reporting on this a little bit earlier. we're sorting through this on our end. conor come back when you have more from jerusalem there. martha: our thanks to him. this is breaking news right now. we want to bring in ambassador john bolton to get his reaction to this. you heard what conor powell told us. what do you think, ambassador? >> i don't take anyt
issue by president obama who warned syria's dictator bashar al-assad that he should not cross that line. bill: the white house has been briefed and the white house has to make some decisions in this. i think the days are becoming more desperate and the regime is more desperate and we know where the chemical weapons are, end quote. peter doocy leads the coverage in washington. how certain are the lawmakers that chemical weapons have been used, peter? >> reporter: not 100% certain, bill but senator feinstein says lawmakers have seen the same intelligence the white house has seen. mike rogers the chairman of the house intelligence committee said in an interview about syria i have a high probability to believe that chemical weapons were used w we need the final verification. i, mike rogers, chairman. intelligence committee would come to the conclusion they are either positioned for use or ready to do that or in fact have been used. if a final verification about chemical weapons use is made, congressman rogers says the united states is morally obligated to take out syria's weapons delivery s
to the syrian army through iraqi air space. >> anything that supports president assad is problematic. and i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are, in fact, helping to sustain president assad. there are members of congress and people in america who increasingly are watching what iraq is doing, and wondering how it is that a partner in the efforts for democracy and a partner for whom americans feel they have tried so hard to be helpful, how that country can be, in fact, doing something that makes it more difficult to achieve our common goals. >> nbc's mike taibbi is live for us in akabul, afghanistan. mike, let's talk. this is not a photo op. this is some tough talk from john kerry. how is it being received? >> well, it has been tough talk from secretary of state john kerry, and you wonder how spirited the discussions are going to be with afghan president hamid karzai. they're meeting and now there will be a joint press conference later. the two men know each other. kerry has made five previous trips here when he was a senator. but there have been strained rel
before assad goes. jessica yellin is live from amman, jordan where that press conference just wrapped. jessica, the president said assad would go but sounded perhaps a little annoyed about being asked how that might happen. why was he seemingly annoyed? >> well, jake, we counted and this is the sixth time that the president or a member of his administration has said assad must go just in the last month alone. but none of them has laid out a plan or a path for direct action by the united states to help remove assad from power. without any direct military intervention by the u.s. the president knows he is vulnerable to criticism. that he is standing by while a massacre is taking place and that is a particularly sharp and poignant charge when he is standing here in jordan where they are providing refuge to some 7,000 syrians who are fleeing for safety every day. some 7,000 people crossing the border into jordan from syria each day because of the violence there. >> i believe the king abdullah of jordan said that the settlements of refugees now form something like the fifth largest town in
join the effort of others to arm the opposition? how long will assad stay in power? that changes on almost a day-to-day basis because the situation is so uncertain as it enters the third year. the president is a bit defensive because people ask where was the world's biggest super power? you are supposed to be the voice of humanitarian needs around the world. how could you let this go on so long? why haven't you done more? the president said today at the news conference the united states from the start was calling on assad to step down and we know if you look at the calendar it is simply not true. many other countries were ahead of the united states in calling for assad to step down but it's a tough one for the president. he is right in the sense the united states used military force in this region from the beginning, there is still a big hangover from the iraq war in this part of the world. it would have been controversial. all the choices are difficult. he does get a bit defensive when that question is posed, wolf. >> he certainly does at least that is the impression you get fro
's a long standing syria through the decline or democrat myself of the assad regime, which i think is inevitable, will be a serious blow to iran. >> so if you have washington, sir, on one side of the scale and tehran on the other, who does baghdad more closely align with? >> well, our hope is, of course, that it will be a truly democratic regime which will be primarily loyal to the interests of the people in iraq and that their views will be consistent with others in supporting and strengthening democratic institutions. but as with many of the other countries in the middle east, there are a whole series of conflicting interests there and it will play out over a long period of time. but our interest is in democratic institutions, democratic societies who will serve their people and not be so much interested in the kinds of conflicts that have raged for so long in that region. >> you mentioned your hopes are for the inevitable assad regime there in syria. but today one of the national coalition, the head of that resigned. he was the key u.s. ally among the rebels. how big of a blow i
, to prop up assad in syria and that this is something that americans and the congress, that the administration, cannot understand or tolerate, and as kerry told us afterwards, it was a very spirited conversation, because he got a lot of pushback from maliki. maliki argued that assad is facing extremists in this country. so he basically, even though he's not terrible sympathetic with assad politically, assad staying in power is very important for maliki's domestic politics because he fears a takeover by the rebels would actually lead to rebellion fact. the message from kerry was pretty tough. that congress is losing patience with iraq and that maliki will not have any role in the political decisions to come once assad falls with this pll political transition being worked out with international leaders, if he continues to help iran prop up assad. >> there are reports also that the head of the syrian opposition coalition reports that he resigned this post at some point today. what do we know about that, and what kind of complications could that present for the united stat
, maybe chlorine gas, that's not nerve agents. i think that assad may have been testing the waters. if chemicals were used, you've got to watch if he's going to use them in the future as the situation grows increaselying desperate and feels he has nothing to do lose, but meanwhile for us and for the israelis, apart from the geopolitical mess and instability, the real and present danger is chemical weapons falling into the hands of islamist fanatics. we are apparently, i'm told, we're told, we're working on a plan to deal with that militarily if necessary, but if we have to, megyn, it's going to be ugly and tough and messy. >> megyn: and i wanted just to clarify so it was the israeli minister of intelligence and strategic affairs who says it's apparently clear that a chemical weapons were used in syria and that that alleged attack will be a main topic of conversation between those two leaders today. ralph stand by, i'd love to hear from you on the opposite side of this presser to get some context on what we're about to hear. if the israelis are saying that syria has crossed the red
or others. he believes that we need to change president assad's calculation. >> there has been disagreement in the past in, within the cabinet. we now know that hillary clinton and the c.i.a. director and others wanted some, and the defense team as well, leon panetta, wanted to arm the rebels. the president is still dead set against that. we don't know where secretary kerry comes down. is this an issue where the president is going to have to move under pressure from allies? >> i think this is an issue that the people at the white house wrestle with every single day. the human cost of assad's actions are horrific. and we struggle with the human toll and hearing these stories from the region, about innocent people that are suffering. so what the president has done is rejected this notion that either we arm them or we're not supporting them. there's been enormous diplomatic effort put behind helping the opposition. there's been considerable money, hundreds of millions of dollars in humanitarian relief and nonlethal assistance to the opposition. we simply haven't taken a step towards a military
, both the assad regime and the rebels are blaming one another for the deadly rocket blasts that killed the at least 31 people and that included 21 civilians. now, according to reuters photographer who was on the ground, people were seen suffocating in the streets and the air apparently smelled of chlorine. it's unclear who is behind the attack, the white house is expressing skepticism over the regime's claim that it was the rebels. >> at this time we have no evidence to substantiate that charge and we're skeptical deeply of a regime that might make that charge given that the regime has lost all credibility in the eyes of the syrian people and the world. having said that we're obviously assessing the reports and without getting into intelligence matters, i can tell you that we're making evaluations about the reports. >> sean: now, as the obama administration continues to make assessments about the developing situation overseas, questions are raised if the u.s. should intervene in the civil war. the president said the chemical weapons against the syrian people would constitute a red line
. to the kingdom of jordon he announced an additional $2 million of u.s. aid. >> i am confident assad will go. it's not a question of if, it's when. >> asked how that will happen, he struck a defensive note. >> it's fair to say that the united states often finds itself in a situation where it goes in military it is criticized and if it doesn't then people say, why don't you go in militarily? >> reporter: former allies whose three year stand off had ripples across the region. >> timing was good for that conversation to take place. i discussed it with prime minister netanyahu and pwoeftbo us agreed the moment was right, and fortunately they were able to begin the process of rebuilding the relations between two important countries in the region. >> reporter: concerning back to syria, jordon's king abdullah offered assad asylum in jordon, but when asked if that offer still stands, he did not renew the pledge. >>> in other news, a 10-year-old boy is dead this morning. one other person clinging to live after a display sign fell on them in an airport in birmingham, alabama. the report was the sign of ar
it a significant esklation of the assad regime. >> the carnage grows. the port is building in the west to give weapons to syrian rebels. cnn's nick peyton walsh is joining us from beirut. let's start with the rockets fired into lebanon. how close to the capitol did they come? >> reporter: it was still pretty far out in the border region between lebanon and syria. very mountainous, indistinct where the border is. we understand two war planes hit derelict buildings, but governments tried to keep out of the fighting with a policy that calls disassociation. the concern is not that this will get a government or military response back to syria, but it might ignite the sectarian tensions inside lebanon, which pretty much mirror those that play in syria. also point out, wolf, rebels unleashing a barrage of rockets in central damascus, too. a real uptick in violence today, wolf. >> when it comes to arming the rebels, looks like there's a change emerging from the united states. what's going on? >> reporter: well, john kerry came out today and said quite clearly that he would not stand in the way of alli
spirited discussion on the subject of the over flights. anything that supports president assad is problematic and i made it very clear to the prime minister that the over flights in iran are, in fact, helping to sustain president assad and his regi regime. >> customer reported he left the meeting without reaching an agreement with maliki. those oppose to assad's government is trying to maintain a coalition after the backed opposition resigned. with the help of the cia, arab nations in turkey have sharply stepped up aid to the rebels. there is a troublesome straight line from afghanistan, where the secretary of state is this morning, through iran, through iraq, and into syria. >> i think the people who also have noticed this are the afghan leadersh leadership. so it's interesting. you have secretary hagel who does a visit. secretary kerry now doing the visit. the president hasn't been to afghanistan in a year now and other things taking his attention in the region whether iran and rising tensions with syria and economic challenges in jordan, et cetera. they are watching this stu
whether our policy is right. it's not too early to know how history will judge assad. that's easy. but in terms of whether or not we have proceeded in a more deliberate way than some would want us to, and probably a little more than i would want us to if you want to get into that, nonetheless the goal here is to make sure that what happens after assad is, is stable, is diverse, is not chaotic. that the right people are the ones that take over when assad goes. and that's, that's a matter of putting in place, if possible, a kind of an interim political coalition, which will have broad support inside of syria, which will not see a long period of retribution and violence following the fall of assad which will happen. and putting that in place to the extent that's possible is what is going on now. at the same time, supporting the opposition, at least those elements of the opposition which we believe are positive, constructive, progressive elements, but that are not the extreme element that otherwise could turn syria into a, if possible, hard to imagine, even, worst case, than is with a
in syria. we're all talking about the emphasis is on helping the resistance against president assad reach victory. obama keeps saying it's not matter of if but when president assad leaves. that's not really so sure. looking at the what's happening on the ground, the breakup of syria is more likely rather than a clear victory of one side winning or losing and president assad leaving the country altogether. so it's really a matter of the next step. what happens after whatever happens in syria. the threat is to the region. the countries on the borders of syria. turkey has its problems. jordan could well have its problems very soon. lebanon. so it's a very -- it's a situation that's very volatile. syria has been imploding and the fear, of course, is that it will explode. america's options -- what it needs to do is help the region formulate some kind of way of dealing with the problem inside syria. american troops on the ground very unlikely, but, of course, there are already special forces, american special forces, british special forces, and i believe french special forces inside jordan trai
that hezbollah's ally assad's regime has sock piled rockets, we will guard against that. i made it clear to assad and all that follow his orders, we will chemicalate the use of weapons or the transfer of those weapons. the world is watching and we will hold you accountable. [applause] the syrian people have the right to be free from the grip of a dictator who would rather kill s own people than relinquish power. assad must go so a serious future can begin. because true stability in syria depends on establishing a government that is responsible to its people. one that protects all communities within its borders while making peace with countries beyond them. that this is what i think about when i think about israel's security. when i think about israel's security i also think about the people who have a living memory of the holocaust. faced with a government that is called for iran's disruption. no wound their israel views this as a threat. this is not simply a challenge for israel but it is a danger for the entire world, including the united states. [applause] a nuclear-armed iran will raise the r
assad is widely believed to have a chemical weapons arsenal, including nerve agents as well as mustard gas. the parliament of cyprus voted to reject a bill that would tax bank deposits in order to qualify for an international bailout package. to receive $13 billion from the e.u. and the international monetary fund, cyprus has to raise $7.5 billion on its own. but taxing people's bank accounts proved unpopular, even when the provision was added to shield small savers. banks across cyprus will remain closed until thursday to avoid a run on cash. uncertainty about the cyprus situation set markets around the world and on wall street on edge. the dow jones industrial average gained more than three points to close above 14,455. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3229. seven u.s. marines were killed after a mortar unexpectedly exploded during a training exercise in western nevada. military officials said that prompted the pentagon to halt the use of the mortar worldwide until an investigation can be completed. the accident happened last night at the hawthorne army depot. the marines who
as president assad becomes more vulnerable. >> i agree with that. i think there really is a danger that they could be used. and they pose a continuing threat. but making the red line chemical weapons entirely and just focusing on that i think sends a very bad message which is it is perfectly fine for him to butcher his people with anything other than chemical weapons, scud attacks, airplane attacks, etcetera. i think there needs to be a stronger line on other weapons as well. >> that is an interesting point. on twitter, i hate to invoke twitter but it is the seventh anniversary. so it is okay for assad to kill 70,000 men, women, and children but just don't use these weapons to do so. >> right. >> why is this a red line even existing? >> it's a red line because clearly of the humanitarian consequences and also because of israel as a neighbor and so forth. the possible fallout. i agree. i think the casualties are maybe approaching a hundred thousand, a million people made refugees, you know, it's clear i think that american leadership is needed in trying to bring this conflict to a c
at these reports. press press issued a warning to the assad regime. -- press secretary jay carney. >> i'm not going to discuss intelligence but important as fight in syria intensifies and fighting becomes more desperate that the united states and international community make it absolutely clear to assad that the use of chemical weapons would be totally unacceptable. the president was clear when he said if assad and those under his command use chemical weapons and fail to secure them there will be consequences and they will behold accountable. jenna: joining us is a research fellow at the new american foundation. he has traveled extensively in syria during this conflict many times and we called upon him for his expertise in this part of the world. brock, when you hear the reports come out what should we consider about them. >> first we need to know that the syria has the 30 or fourth largest stockpile of chemical weapons in the world. there are the a thousand tons of chemical agents in the past the obama administration will use the them as more and more of the country splits out of the regime contro
and white house press secretary jay carney issued a warning to the assad regime. >> we have no evidence to substantiate the charge that the opposition has used chemical weapons. we are deeply skeptical of a regime has lost all credibility and warn the regime against making these kind of charges as any kind of pretext or cover for its use of chemical weapons. >> neither side of the conflict has provided documentation that chemical agents have been used. senator lindsey graham spoke about the allegations telling foreign policy that quote this. we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapons sites either in conjunction with our partners or, if nothing else, by ourselves. if the choice is to send in troops to secure the weapons sites versus allowing chemical weapons to get in the hands of some of the most violent people in the world, i vote to cut this off before it becomes a problem. but following intelligence briefings, the chairs of both the house and senate intelligence committee said they believe president bashar al assad has crossed the so-called red line in the civil war. >> i
on assad to step down because of the horrific violence being inflicted on the syrian eople. jordan took a leading role in the political transition to a more stable government. we are looking at strengthening the syrian opposition. we share concerns about violence spilling across the borders. i want to make it clear. the united states is committed to the security of jordan, which is backed by our strong alliance. he jordanian people have displayed extraordinary generosity, but the strains of some many refugees inevitably is showing. every day, they are far from home, but this is a heavy burden. need the international community to step up and help houlder this burden. the united states will certainly do our part. we are these single largest donor of assistance to the syrian people. some of this has helped jordan, and for days i have been announcing that my administration will provide jordan with an additional $200 illion in budget support as it cares for syrian refugees and jordanian communities affected by this crisis. this will mean more assistance with basic services including educatio
and will continue to do so, but also said, and i'm quoting loosely, assad will go. it's not an issue of if but when. how important is it for the president to sound so certain on that, especially while in the region? >> well, of course, as you know, there's turbulence throughout the region arising out of the situation in syria. just today the press reports that the prime resigned because of differences arising from the conflict in syria. it's a destabilizing influence throughout the region. very important for the president to address. he's got to walk a very fine line there. the united states does not want to become involved in another military venture in the middle east. we just finished a 12-year war in iraq and afghanistan. we're now drawing that to an end. we don't want to get plunged into another long-term military presence. at the same time, it's very clear that we have to and do support the opposition to the government's regime there and that i think as the president has correctly said, the days are numbered. history is filled with examples of dictators who have been toppled by revolutions an
to assist the assad regime. john kerry said had he a very spirited discussion with iraqi prime minister nuri al maliki was was asked for further information. not exactly the concession he wanted there. also during this visit news broke of the resignation of opposition leader, something which mr. kerry described as many inevitable, saying they'd already begun working with his son and say this is all part what have he referred to as a continuum in leadership. the opposition was bigger than one man. but clearly putting a brave face on a man who the u.s. has put quite a lot of investment into and an opposition which seems to be crumb pling around them just as the u.s. begins to pick up its fefrefforts to provide furt aid. nick pay tton walsh, cnn, baghd. >>> a couple sat on the roof of this house in their cadillac. >>> and new york's mayor is spending millions of his own money to try to end gun violence. his tv ad blitz begins this week. is kevin. to prove to you that aleve is the better choice for him, he's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll be with him all day as he g
of men and women and children in syria right now. the fact that hizbollah's ally -- the assad regime -- has stockpiles of chemical weapons only heightens the urgency. we will continue to cooperate closely to guard against that danger. i've made it clear to bashar al- assad and all who follow his orders: we will not tolerate the use of chemical weapons against the syrian people, or the transfer of those weapons to terrorists. the world is watching, we will hold you accountable. the syrian people have the right to be freed from the grip of a dictator who would rather kill his own people than relinquish power. assad must go so that syria's future can begin. because true stability in syria depends upon establishing a government that is responsible to its people -- one that protects all communities within its borders, while making peace with countries beyond them. these are the things i think about when i think about israel's security. when i consider israel's security, i also think about a people who have a living memory of the holocaust, faced with the prospect of a nuclear-armed irania
of the disasters of iraq was the dissolution of the state. so when bashar al assad goes, and the government believes ultimately he will, those institutions, those governing bodies will be necessary for the day after. for those people who are left holding the bag, what has become basically a sectarian war, to put back a government. it is a critical lesson and a police take we cannot ever make again. >> as we look back and relitigate the war in iraq, i think it is easy to say on its face, it was a clear mistake and we'll never do this again, how could we do this. let's not forget that. a lot of democrats voted for this war. including hillary clinton. that's what i want to ask you about it. she voted for the iraq war resolution in 2002. 2007, refused to see that vote as a police take. she has defended that since. i'm wondering if you think that is going to be a political problem for her. in 2016 if she ends up running. >> let me say a couple things. having been in the white house i realize how hard it is to govern and to make these national security decisions. it is not black and white and it
. take a look at jordan to try to buck up the rebels so they can defeat assad. these are real steps. >> sean: colonel i see a weak president being run over because the he does nothing. i can't imagine them flying arms over our space with nuclear weapons and nothing happening. >> we're seeing consequences of bidding from hinld. let's deal with what we saw this morning. i've seen reports and unclassified version of it. we've seen the footage that came out of today. it does not appear to me as a person who understands a little bit about chemical weapons about 10 years ago today wearing a chemical suit you may remember and broadcasting on your show. thon footage you're watching now there is no evidence of anyone suffering from exposure, whether it's propaganda on part of the rebels or government it appears to me there is a person who understands what consequences would be, there is nobody that can suffer with chemical weapons. >> sean: what about the reporter of the chlorine smell? 31 dead? >> i don't want to take any thing from our colleagues but when a large munition like a war scud g
of assad. regime of damascus. or opposition groups that may be outside the realm of what the intelligence community knows about. this information is shared and israelis said they would react again and have reacted by military in lebanon. beth parties are very concerned about what is happening in syria and of course chemical weapons are first among them. i think this is a very volatile situation that could develop any week as we saw yesterday with the latest report. >> andrea mitchell was reporting how this could be a new beginning for netanyahu and obama. how there was more warmth between them or less after chill between them might be a better way of phrasing it. but i wonder to the extent that true, how much do you think that has to do with the simple fact that obama was re-elected last year? so much of the frostiness in the first term seemed to be na netanyahu was basically betting that obama would be a one-term president. betting on romney victory. here is the re-elected more confident and assertive obama making a trip to israel. did that force netanyahu to be more con ciliatory maybe
. but when iraq is now. >> bill: kate,. >> iranians wanted in is now offering support to assad? >> bill: what you are talking about is theoretical but go back to my talking points. >> no it's not theoretical it's reality right now. >> bill: we don't know how iraq is going to deal with iran. iran is more powerful than iraq. you can't trust iraq and you can't trust afghanistan. you can't trust any of these people. they are not looking out for us. >> that's right. >> we have to further our own interest. >> bill: blood and treasure and to hope that the outcome is going to be favorable to the u.s.a. is just that, a hope. we can't be risking this kind of treasure and blood on a hope. you go in, you smack saddam hussein, you get the hell out. all right. now, i'm going to give each of you about 45 seconds to sum it it up. all right. kirsten, you go first. >> i disagree with you, bill, i don't even know what to do with that you are absolutely right it is too many people died. we spent too much money. there is too many people who are suffering now because of this at home, people with -- whether it's me
to join the battle against bashar assad. number two, two teenagers accused of killing a toddler who was in a stroller today made their first appearances before a judge. number one tonight, the supreme court set to hear two cases on gay marriage. first up tomorrow, the battle over california's ban on same sex marriage. then on wednesday, a challenge to a federal law that denies benefits to couples who are legally married in their home state and that's "the fox report's" top five. on this day in the year 1911 a deadly disaster forever changed the way america treats its workers when a fire broke out in the triangle shirt waist factory in new york city. located on floors of a 10 story building. place was something sort of a sweat shop. mostly young immigrant women came trapped. like many other companies of the time the owners had locked the doors during work hours leaving employee no, sir way to easily escape. all tolled, 146 people died. many of them jumped to their death. it would prompt a series of worker protection laws and regulations. the building still stands today, now part of n
is shipping weapons to syria through iraqi air space. >> anything that supports president assad is problematic. >> ifill: kerry said sunday that he and iraqi prime minister nouri al-maliki had a very spirited discussion on the issue. >> i also made it clear to him that there are members of congress and people in america who increasingly are watching what iraq is doing and wondering how it is that a partner in the efforts for democracy and a partner for whom americans feel they have tried so hard to be helpful, how that country can be, in fact, doing something that makes it more difficult to achieve our common goals. >> ifill: for kerry, stopping the violence in syria after two years and 70,000 people killed will be another top diplomatic priority. so will the years-long effort to block iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. today both problems have proved intractable. at the same time, president obama's trip to the middle east last week hassles put new focus on trying to restart the israeli-palestinian peace process. the trip through the region has provided kerry with a first-hand introduction
it difficult for it to part ways with assad, but they recognize, i think already, that they must do so and are embarking on a transition there. russia's relationship with iran is very important. remember, they once shared a long border when russia was the soviet union, and they've had a fraught relationship on and off at times. so we can enlist their support sometimes and other times that will not be the case. but we have to be patient and firm. again, our policies should be based on our self-interest, not trusting or mistrusting any other leader. >> diplomat and former senate majority leader george mitchell, thanks for joining us. >> thanks, jake. >>> those russians are seeing red over an 11th hour bailout plan to save the small island of cyprus. it's not that the country wanted cyprus to go under. it's that some russian investors will take the biggest hilt. the plan basically says, let's have cyprus pay its bills by using money from deposits of more than 100,000 euros. that's because nothing else is insured. p but aa lot of those deposits come from russian oligarchs. despite the ange
, vowing that the assad regime will be held accountable if it has in fact used chemical weapons as the rebels claim. >> plet's go to jerusalem first with jessica. a very powerful meeting today. very interesting between the president and the prime minister. >> wolf, that's right. president obama here in jerusalem for the first overseas trip of his second term. a visit which in symbolism already president obama is emphasizing the u.s.'s commitment to ensuring israel's security and correcting any past sleights, real or perceived. president obama and prime minister netanyahu together in israel. they were acting like long-lost friends, joking, getting casual, complimenting each other's children while taking a little dig. >> they are very good looking young men who clearly got their looks from their mother. >> well, i could say the same of your daughters. >> this is true. >> we get it, the frosty days are over. now they're ready to link arms on a variety of issues. but there are still differences in their posture. >> on syria, an israeli official tells cnn, the israeli government beli
and it will be very critical that if there are chemical weapons being used by the assad regime president obama responds accordingly. that is another red line he is drawing. that is red line irisraelies will be watching and iranians. is this president serious about committing to red lines and honoring the red lines. uma: quickly with obama speaking to young people in israel, that was very interesting strategy on his part because he knows he often does well in those kind of settings, at that type of theater backdrop. >> i think that's right. president obama shown in the u.s. context he is he is brilliant at grassroots activism and getting support of the grassroots. he tried to go over the head of prime minister netanyahu. he tried to appeal to the grassroots to build political support, get beyond a 10% approval rating. he will need that and support of israeli people if he will is for israelies to take significant risks for peace with respect to the palestinians. uma: you used that word over, risk, over and over again. >> there is risk on israeli borders. missiles from the north. missiles from th
on back channels in moscow to get russia and vladimir putin to realize that assad is not around forever and at some point it's time to jump ship and support who is there in the future. my understanding is that doesn't seem to have pushed the russians at all. the russians are still firmly backing assad and don't think this is the time to switch. the alternatives in terms of arming the rebels is really all that the west is now looking at but they still have these reservations that if you give arms to elements of the rebels, how do you know that they don't end up in the hands of the extremis extremists? if america is going to dictate what happens in the future in syria, it needs to have a place at the table. it needs to be able to be part of the discussion and i suspect that will eventually lead to america taking part with a coalition in giving small arms to syrian rebels. >> ron, it's fascinating, that the president goes to israel without a peace plan in his back pocket or without any hopes of a peace plan in his back pocket. almost unprecedented. does this tell us how important iran is n
of saudi arabia have been clamped down because it doesn't serve u.s. interest. >> what assad has done in syria is way worse than what's happening. >> no. let's not equalize them. but it's to make clear that the u.s. doesn't necessarily step in. >> it makes strategic calculations about what its interests are. but in the case of syria the worrying thing about the situation in syria, the first wave of this, particularly tunisia which was entirely nonviolent, the egyptian revolt which was nonviolent although skirmishes and different forms of violence, to the syrian movement which began as nonviolent and faced such massive brutal horrific massacres has armed themselves and has become a long bloody civil war that has profound regional consequences and fear of spilling out and hezbollah looms large. >> wish we had more historical depth how we look at this. this is the third arab state to be devastated by a civil war. without pointing fingers of blame, lebanon for 15 years was devastated by civil war. foreign armies, foreign intelligence services. after the u.s. invasion in 2003 iraq went thr
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